About Your Hair: Queens Make Own Decision

By Dr. Linda Amerson
www.hairandscalpessentials.com

Wigs, Wigs, Wigs! The longer the better to enhance physical appearance. Long hair is a stigma from Tot and Tiaras, to Ms. International Beauty Queen. Hair extensions are used for added fullness and length, gowns, talent, swimsuits & questions. Care for your scalp should not be neglected. Regular shampooing, and moisturizing for natural hair, under wigs is very important! It’s a new day! Many beauty contestants are saying NO to wigs.

In 2010, Kayla Martell won the Miss Delaware Crown. She tried four times! Three of those times she competed bald. Perseverance pays off. Kay lost her hair in the fifth grade because of alopecia areata. She feels more approachable in public when she wears a wig, and people do not worry if she is ill. However, She loves the way she looks bald. Kayla has been an advocate to encourage young girls diagnosed with alopecia areata. In 2011, Sandra Dubose Gibson was crowned Mrs. Black North Carolina, and she began her singing talent with her original song, “I’m Beautiful,” removing her wig after her first few notes.

At 25, she was diagnosed with alopecia areata, which progressed into alopecia totalis. Sandra is the author of, “My Crown and Glory, It’s Not About the Hair.” She is a mother of two girls and an advocate for positive self-esteem…with or without hair. In 2013, Angelica Galindez won Miss Philippines Earth USA, Diagnosed also with alopecia totalis, her drive is to empower other women suffering from alopecia.

In 2019, Dr. Meaghan Dickerson of Houston was crowned Ms. Plus Intercontinental North America. When she first began her pageantry, Dr. Dickerson said she did not realize how expensive it was. She had to get used to the glam look and wearing wigs during pageants. She does not have alopecia. In 2019, Miss South Africa, Zozibini Tunzi was crowned Miss Universe.

She took a stand against prejudiced beauty standards for Black women. She refused to wear a wig for the pageant…winning the crown with her natural, short unprocessed hair. I could go on and on about other bold, bald beauty queens, and advocates who are using their platforms. Alopecia does not define them. Kudos!